RadioandMusic
| 04 Aug 2020
Magnetic Fields festival will expand to other venues in next two-three years

MUMBAI: In spite of reaching out to 2,000 people with its festival- Magnetic Fields during its second edition, organiser Munbir Chawla feels that it is a significantly small number when compared to other festivals. However, there is one thing that is very clear in his plan (for the festival) and that to grow it organically rather than targeting a huge set of audience.

“We are not targeting 20,000 festival goers because we plan to grow organically,” said Chawla to Radioandmusic.com. “Compared to the first two editions of Magnetic Fields Festival, the third edition has grown drastically.” In the upcoming, third edition, the festival will have multiple stages and more secret gigs (that will only be made known through word of mouth at the time of the festival) during the three-day music extravaganza, which will be held from 18 to 20 December in Alsisar, Rajasthan. In the next two-three years, he assured that the festival will take the expansion route to different venues.  

The festival will also have pre-party in venues across Bengaluru, Mumbai and New Delhi. Chawla revealed that the venue for Bengaluru has already been confirmed.  

One of the stages at this festival is the Red Bull Music Academy North Stage, which is one of many things that are to come at the music fest. “We have been lucky with all the collaborations this edition,” stated Chawla. As this has empowered the festival’s promoters to curate an event with more variety for this edition.

Through Magnetic Fields, Chawla is already helping the local community in Rajasthan to increase employment. When asked if he was open to partnering with the Rajasthan Government, he said that the team is open to all kinds of partnerships, including with government authorities. “The community around us is growing along with us. We are employing many locals and adding to the economy of the village” he added.

Apart from music, the festival will also have various installations. “We have called for applications for various installations at the festival. In return, we are offering free tickets to them,” revealed Chawla. There will also be screening of films, and a treasure hunt, during the festival.

More than 30 artists have been revealed so far, and there are plans to add more names to a list which already includes acts like Ratatat, Soul Clap, Antal, Kutmah, DJ Koze and Objekt, Mumdance, Rudoh, TMPST, Superfuzz, Alisha Batth and Fuzzy Logic among others.

Magnetic Fields Festival, which is set in a backdrop of the 17th century but presents the latest sounds created in India, has managed to attract about 10 per cent of international audience, with 90 per cent coming from India. When quizzed if they plan to target more audiences outside India, Chawla said, “This festival was started to provide Indian audiences with a different experience, so we will continue to cater to the Indian audiences. However, we also welcome international audiences.” People from Europe and the US have been seen attending the festival.

Festival goers, who were not able to buy festival passes during the early and super early bird ticket sales, will have to shell-out upto Rs 8000 for the three-day event, excluding accommodation. Attendees can opt for either a palace or tent accommodation, both offering a different set of experiences. There is also an option to pitch one’s own tent and enjoy camping.

In terms of the Indian music industry, Chawla agrees that niche genres will support the economy in the next ten years. “The Indian music industry is growing massively. Bollywood does support the economy, however, there will be another space in the music industry that will contribute to it as well,” Chawla said.